• College Planning Knowledge is Power
  • Countdown to College

    Most parents want to give their children the best opportunity for success, and getting into the right college may help open many doors. A recent study by Georgetown University found that 63 percent of marketable jobs in 2018 will require post-secondary education.¹

    Unfortunately, being accepted to the college of their choice may not be as easy as it once was. These days, preparing for college means setting goals, staying focused and tackling a few key milestones along the way.

    Before High School

    The road to college begins even before high school. Start by helping your elementary and middle school children develop a love for learning. Encourage good study habits and get them dreaming about college. A trip to a nearby university or your alma mater may help plant the seed in their minds. When your child reaches middle school, take the time to find out which prerequisite courses may set the right track for math and science in high school.

    The earlier you consider how you expect to pay for college costs the better. The average college graduate today owes $20,000 in debt, while the average salary for a recent graduate is $30,000.²

    Freshman Year

    Before the school year begins, consider meeting with your child’s guidance counselor. Discuss college goals and make sure your child is enrolled in classes that are structured to help him or her pursue those goals. Also, encourage your child to choose challenging classes. Many universities look for students who push themselves when it comes to learning. At the same time, keep a close eye on grades. Every year on the transcript counts. If your child is struggling in a subject, don’t wait to get a tutor. One-on-one instruction can be a huge benefit when mastering difficult material.

    In addition to academic performance, many colleges want prospective students to be well rounded, so encourage your child to engage in extracurricular activities, such as sports, music, art, community service and social clubs.

    Sophomore Year

    During their sophomore year, some students may have the opportunity to take a practice SAT. The practice test is a good way to give your child an idea of what the test entails and which areas need improvement. If your child is enrolled in advanced placement (AP) courses, encourage good performance on AP exams. A solid grade shows universities your child can succeed at a higher level of learning.

    Sophomore year is also a good time to get some depth in extracurricular activities. Help your child identify passions and stick to them. Encourage your child to read as much as possible. Whether they read Crime and Punishment or Sports Illustrated, they will expand their vocabulary and critical thinking skills. Summer may be a good time for sophomores to get a job, do an internship or travel to help fill their quiver of experiences.

    Junior Year

    Near the beginning of junior year, your child can take the Preliminary SAT (PSAT), also known as the National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (NMSQT). Even if he or she won’t need to take the SAT for college, taking the PSAT could open doors for scholarship money. Junior year may be the most challenging in terms of course load. It is also a critical year for showing good grades in difficult classes.

    Top colleges look for applicants who are future leaders. Encourage your child to take a leadership role in an extracurricular activity. This doesn’t mean he or she has to be drum major or captain of the football team. Leading may involve helping an organization with fundraising, marketing or community outreach.

    In the spring of junior year, your child will want to take the SAT or ACT. An early test date may allow time for taking the test again in senior year, if necessary. No matter how many times your child takes the test, colleges will only look at the best score.

    Senior Year

    For many students, senior year is the most exciting time of high school. They will finally begin to reap the benefits of all their efforts during the previous years. Once your child has decided which schools to apply for, make sure you keep on top of deadlines. Applying early can increase your student’s chance of acceptance.

    Source: Foxbusiness.com, January 3, 2012


    Now is also the time to apply for scholarships. Your child’s guidance counselor can help your identify scholarships within reach. Also, find out about financial aid. According to Finaid.org, millions of students miss out on Pell Grant money every year because they assume they may not qualify.³

    Finally, talk to your child about living away from home. Help make sure he or she knows how to manage money wisely and pay bills on time. You may also want to talk about social pressures some college freshmen face for the first time when they move away from home.

    For many people, college sets the stage for life. Making sure your child has options when it comes to choosing a university can help shape their futures. Work with your children today to make goals and develop habits that will help ensure their success.

    South Paws Wanted

    Your child doesn’t have to be the high school valedictorian to qualify for a scholarship. In fact, thousands of dollars are awarded each year for the most unusual things. Consider these:

    1. Right-handers Need Not Apply.Frederick and Mary F. Beckley offer $1,000 to lucky left-handed students (who also want to attend Juniata College in Huntington, PA).
    2. Stick It. Duck Brand Duct Tape offers $3,000 to students who go to their high school prom dressed entirely in duct tape
    3. How Tall Is Tall? Tall Clubs International offers $1,000 each year to a tall person attending college. Get out the measuring tape. A woman must be at least 5’10” and a man must be 6’2” or taller to qualify.
    4. Candy Connoisseurs Unite. The American Association of Candy Technologists offers $5,000 to students who have exhibited an interest in confectionary technology.
    5. From “Mr. Top Ten” Himself. David Letterman offers $10,000 to students of Ball State University (his alma mater) who produce an original video, audio, written, graphic or film presentation.

    Source: Financialaidfinder.com, January 30, 2012


    1. Foxbusiness.com, January 3, 2012
    2. Moneycentral.msn.com, January 30, 2012
    3. Foxbusiness.com, January 3, 2012



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    This article is for information and educational purposes only and does not necessarily represent the opinion of Protective Life. Protective Life did not assist in the preparation of this material. For information about Protective Life and its products and services, visit www.protective.com or call us at 844-733-5433.

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  • Tip: Parlez-vous Francais?

    Many universities like to see multiple years of foreign language on a transcript.

    Digital Federal Credit Union, January 2010

  • Fast Fact: Pre-Approved.

    The U.S. Department of Education says that all students, regardless of financial status, are eligible for up to $27,000 in federal Stafford Loans over four years.

    Foxbusiness.com, January 3, 2012